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Rinn

Rinn Reads

I've always been a big reader - it runs in the family. I read pretty much every genre, but my particular favourites are sci-fi and fantasy, with the occasional thriller, historical fiction or YA novel thrown in.

Currently reading

Dear Fatty
Dawn French
Progress: 37/368 pages
Throne of Glass II
Sarah J. Maas
Progress: 233/432 pages
The Sun in My Eyes: Two-Wheeling East - Josie Dew Also posted on my book blog, Rinn Reads.Having read the first of Josie's books on Japan, A Ride in the Neon Sun, as well as her travel writing on cycling through the USA (Travels in a Strange State), I was delighted to find she had written more - especially on the topic of Japan.Like a female Bill Bryson on wheels, she writes with great wit and humour, and manages to make even normal, everyday situations sound amusing. I really admire her as a person in general, not just as a writer - for fearlessly going out to these countries alone, and travelling by herself, everything she needs on the back of her bike. And she covers such tremendous distances too.Yet whilst most of the book is very funny, there are some rather shocking parts too. Guangzhou, where Josie starts off her journey sounds horrific, as do the cramped ferries with passengers excreting all kinds of bodily fluids over the compartments. However, the good moments definitely outweigh the bad. It is absolutely amazing how Josie is treated by the Japanese - with such respect and kindness, almost everyone goes completely out of their way to give her gifts or help her out. She spends half the book riding around with cabbages and radishes dangling off the back of her backpack, after some kind old ladies spotted her cycling past their field. One school girl even tries to give Josie her own Hello Kitty watch! It also makes me think that, were she doing this in the UK and from elsewhere, she would not be treated in that way, which is quite shameful.Some moments did make me wonder if everything was 100% true, but in the end it makes for entertaining reading, so I'm not too bothered! I would also have liked some clearer distinction between when Japanese and English were being spoken - although Josie claims her Japanese was very basic, from the conversations she had it seemed almost fluent. Whilst the ending is very abrupt - I turned the page with a good chunk of the book left, and found it was a glossary and index - it is also understandable since her brother announced he was getting married in a matter of weeks. Definitely a must read for fans of travel books, Bill Bryson, or those wanting to read about Japan. From the overly generous gifts and invitations (including being offered a place to sleep in a couple's shop, right next to the unemptied cash till and the freedom to help herself to the food in the shop), to impromptu Beatles tributes and chasing down flashers, Josie has some hilarious adventures that are definitely worth reading about.